Monthly Archives: December 2016

278 Great Directors: Hollis Frampton

“I was born during the Age of Machines. A machine was a thing made up of distinguishable ‘parts’ organized in imitation of some function of the human body. Machines were said to ‘work.’ How a machine ‘worked’ was readily apparent to an adept, from inspection of the shape of its ‘parts.’ The physical principles by which machines ‘worked’ were intuitively verifiable. The cinema was the typical survival-form of the Age of Machines. Together with its subset of still photographs, it performed prizeworthy functions: it taught and reminded us (after what then seemed a bearable delay) how things looked, how things worked, how to do things… and of course (by example), how to feel and think. We believed it would go on forever, but when I was a little boy, the Age of Machines ended. We should not be misled by the electric can opener: small machines proliferate now as though they were going out of style because they are doing precisely that. Cinema is the Last Machine. It is probably the last art that will reach the mind through the senses.”
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281 Great Directors: Corneliu Porumboiu

“We are this Nouvelle Vague, but I think that each one of us has his own style and makes his own films. I don’t know. I think that if we continue to make good films, we will be there, if not…[laughs] As far as the international praise is concerned, I did not expect to have this success when I started making films. At the same time, they talk about all of us, because it is a small country, and you do not expect to have five, six, seven, or ten directors – you have to put a mark. This is good but at the same time it can be a little bit restrictive.”
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282 Great Directors: Lee Chang-dong

“To discover hidden beauty and meaning in small and trivial things is the fundamental element, not only for film, but also for all art genres. The problem is, beauty doesn’t exist per se. Like the light and shadow, whether it’s visible or not, beauty co-exists with pain, filth, and ugliness. Apricots need to fall down to earth to create a new life. Therefore, art is an irony as itself. As so are our lives.”
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